Saturday, January 28, 2012

DIGITAL EDITION

'Feeding the Urge' is now available in digital edition:

Free Downloadable Pdf Preview 
http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/feeding-the-urge/18852641

Friday, January 27, 2012

INTRODUCING: MARRYING MISSY by Sarah Elle Emm

My special suggestion for the week-end:
MARRYING MISSY is the first novel by the very talented Sarah Elle Emm. 

Tate Sullivan is in a fix: her best friend, Missy Martin, is getting married. 
With constant criticism from Missy Martin, Buckhead heiress and bride-to-be; stress from her intense nursing job; and a short-temper on the rise from her high powered, attorney husband, Georgia-native, Tate Sullivan is engaged in the ultimate balancing act.

Tate has to cope with sleep-deprived night shifts, her closet nicotine habit, her husband's apparent workaholism, her mother's meddlesome behavior, and her ongoing attempt to educate Missy about not making borderline racist remarks about everyone who doesn’t have money or look like her. 

When a collision with a runaway Golden Retriever lands Tate in the arms of the newcomer to Atlanta, Dr. Jackson Greenfield, Tate begins to think her mother has concocted the ultimate scheme. Wedding planning has never been so nerve-racking…or dangerous.

Marrying Missy reveals the complexity of those who are merely planning a wedding, preparing for a marriage, and those who aren't sure what their marriage is—or has become. 

Sarah Elle Emm captures the world of wedding planning for a particular Georgia princess, but sublimely reveals all that is so often forgotten in that process–love and marriage. - The Publisher

Sarah Elle Emm is a native of Evansville, Indiana, and graduate of The University of Evansville. She has lived in Germany, England, Mexico, the southern U.S., the U.S. Virgin Islands, and traveled extensively beyond. Her travels, multi-cultural experience, and love of writing have all influenced her writing. Sarah currently resides in Indianapolis with her Chef husband and their two daughters. She is energetically writing her next novel.



Buy it here: http://www.amazon.com/Marrying-Missy-ebook/dp/B005Y0EC4G
Marrying Missy

Sunday, January 22, 2012

Thursday, January 19, 2012

SPOTLIGHT ON JIM HILLAKER: ESPERANTO EXPERT - A blog interview by Jeffrey Kosh


Today I want to introduce you a very peculiar person:
JIM HILLAKER from Burton (MI)

Jeff: First of all, welcome to my blog, Jim. I invited you here because you are one of the most amazing and intriguing guys on Facebook. You have a passion for Esperanto, a language designed in late 19th century for all of Humanity, and you have a large group of followers on that social network enjoying the same.
Now, please introduce yourself to our public –

Jim: Saluton! Mi estas Jim Hillaker, and I live in Burton, Michigan USA, and was born in the immediately adjacent (and far more famous) City of Flint. I have a BA (major in Spanish., minor in French) from University of Michigan-Flint and an MA in Spanish Linguistcs from Ohio State

And thanks, Jeff. I feel honored, and quite flattered, that you think I am “one of the most amazing and intriguing guys on Facebook.”  And yes, since about 1986, give or take, I have been able to speak the international language Esperanto. 

Jeff: Where does your passion for Esperanto stem from?

Jim: I’ve always been curious about foreign languages since I was a small child. Then when I was 12, I started reading Tolkien’s SILMARILLION, and not only discovered Tolkien, but also his Elvish languages. I began creating my own languages.

At age 15 I began studying Latin. I knew it was the language of the Church and had been a lingua-franca of Western Europe for centuries; Newton even wrote his great work PRINCIPIA in Latin. I thought perhaps it could be a lingua-franca again. At this time I was already starting to create my own worlds, I envisioned a future space-opera world in which Latin was used as the Terran language. I also envisioned a simplified Latin I called ”Traders’ Latin” as a commercial pidgin. Had I not discovered Esperanto soon after, I might have redundantly recreated Latino sine Inflexione or Interlingua (I still love that name and wish Esperanto could be called that), two early competitors to Esperanto of which Interlingua still has a small following (I think it looks like pidgin Italian).

Ironicly it was RPGs that led me to Esperanto. I was still in high school when a friend of mine (a real dungeon-head) had a copy of TSR’s game Top Secret, a modern espionage RPG. Looking thru it I noticed a list of languages a character could have, and one on the list was this mysterious Esperanto. So I was obsessed with finding out what it was. When I got a shoert description, I initially rejected the idea, thinking Latin fulfulled that role. But I came to realize the impracticality of Latin, by the time I started college, I managed to track down an address fo ELNA (Esperanto League for North America), took a little 10-lesson correspondance course, then studied  from the book TEACH YOURSELF ESPERANTO  which I ordered from ELNA,

Not only did I think Esperanto could work as a neutral lingua-franca, I was absolutely enamored with the simplicity, logic, precision, elegance, and beauty of the lamguage. Esperanto is the only language I have actually taught myself to speak without any formal classroom study. It has only 16 basic rules, and once you have those, it’s just a matter of vocabulary. and the vocabulary is quite recognizable, pulled from a variety of languages.

Jeff: Tell us something more about you -

Jim: I have been doing table-top, paper-&-pencil RPGs for over 20 years now, and running my own games for nearly 15 years. This has slowed down now, due mostly to incompatibility of schedules not allowing me to get together with friends. My favorite RPGs are GURPS, DragonStorm, Traveller, Space: 1889, and Prof. M.A.R. Barker’s Tékumel. I have also been working on a new RPG system for years. With the exception of a few DragonStorm games, all the games I have run as game master have been in my own system, and set in universes of my own devising, I have always wanted to be a writer, but I am much better at developing characters, settings, and whole societies, chronologies, and alien species, than I am at plot.

I am also something of a newcomer to Facebook, social networking, and the internet in general.I didn’t get onto Facebook until April 11, 2010. I was amazed by how much it facilitates communication, and even re-connection, with far-flung friends and family. Since that time, I have even created four Facebook pages: Lingojim (to promote my language-oriented services, but now I mostly just post langage-related articles), IPRM International Pro-Constituency Movement (a non-partison political page), Fans of the Valley of Guangi (which I created on a whim), Talkidu (a non-player character from my RPGs). I am also administrator now of the page Namor the Sub-mariner, which was set up by John Hurschel Runion, who got too busy with other things (and I think is one of those in the “Super-Interesting Facebook-User”.category). I also now have something like 465 Facebook friends, at least 150 are Esperantists I met on Facebook.

Jeff: I see you’ve a passion for languages. How many do you speak?

Jim: I am communicative in really only English, Spanish, and Esperanto. I do have a BA minor in French, and I used to translate Portuguese documents into English back when I did document translation. I would say I can read French, Portuguese, Old Castillian, and Latin. Latin I started studying when I was 15, and my grad work was basicly how the Latin of the Iberian peninsula evolved into Spanish. I have also formally studied thru classroom instruction German, Russian, Japanese, and Arabic. On my own I have studied some Classical Greek, Anglo-Saxon, Marc Okrand’s Klingon, J.R.R. Tolkien’s Quenya (High-Elvish), and even Prof. M.A.R. Barker’s Tsolyáni. I have also created languages of my own.

Jeff: What’s your actual job?

Jim:  When I actually am lucky enough to have work, I teach Spanish at the college level. Unfortunately, circumstances have kept me stuck in one of the worse ecomocially-depressed in the US.

Jeff: Do you like reading books? If so, what’s your favorite genre?

Jim: I don’t read as much as I used to; I just don’t seem to have the time. I still read short stories and non-fiction books. But I’d have to say my favorite genres are in Speculative Fiction, i.e., Science-Fiction and Fantasy.

Jeff: Besides ‘Feeding the Urge’, what’s your favorite book of ever?

Jim: If I had to pick just one from the fiction category, I’d have to say THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

Jeff: What’s your favorite author?

Jim: Well, I don’t know if I have a single most favorite, but the short list might be: Jonathan Swift, Samuel Clemens, J. R. R. Tolkien, Robert E. Howard, Clark Ashton Smith, L. Sprague de Camp

Jeff: Is there anything more you would share with us?

Jim: Dr. Zamenhof's Illustrated Biography - By John Hornby and Colin Andrew
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBX-jAa5VYI&feature=share

Jeff: Thank you for sharing with us. My best.

Jim: Thank you for giving me this oportunity. I have reconstructed much of my own personal development in answering some of this questions. Ĝis la revido.



 IF YOU LIKED THIS INTERVIEW, PLEASE CLICK ON ‘FOLLOW THIS BLOG’, THERE WILL BE MORE IN THE FUTURE WITH YOUR SYMBOLIC SUPPORT.

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

SPOTLIGHT ON ANGELA’S DARK POETRY - A blog interview by Jeffrey Kosh


Today I want to introduce you to a new promise in Gothic Poetry,
ANGELA CULMONE from Italy

Jeff: First of all, welcome to my blog. This is my first blog interview so please be kind. I invited you here because Gothic Poetry is a bit rare in your country. I find many of your works interesting and unsettling enough to be compatible with my writings. Now, please introduce yourself to our public –

Angela: Hi! Everyone has a dark side and through these poems I like to feel myself, a vampire. I have never done research on vampires; in fact what I write comes from my imagination and my soul. I use Facebook as a mean to let people know all my poems and share this passion.

J: What kicked you in Gothic Poetry first?

A: The passion for the creatures of hell.

J: Tell us something more on your poems –

A: My poems speak primarily of obscurity, with a dash of love and lust. Occasionally there is some vengeful thought, full of anger and desire to destroy. I think as a predator.

J: Do you work on other media or just poetry?

A: My only passion is writing.

J: What’s your favorite color?

A:  My favorite color is black because it reminds me of the darkness.

J: I'd bet on that. Do you like reading books? If so, what’s your favorite genre?

A: I like reading; in particular I read love stories, adventure, and course of vampires.

J: Besides ‘Feeding the Urge’, what’s your favorite book of ever?

A: The ‘Twilight’ saga.

J: What’s your favorite author?

A: William Shakespeare.

J: Is there anything more you would share with us?

A: I’d like to present you a creation of my daughter, Giada Culmone. She shares the same passion for writing poetry.

Mi ha iniettato il veleno più pericoloso e mortale al mondo, comunemente chiamato "Amore". L'amore è un veleno che inonda le vene, inebria il cuore con il suo soave sapore mortale, penetra in ogni particella del corpo, provoca la morte agonizzante più sensuale e graziosa dell'universo, schiavizza il cuore più selvaggio e freddo...
Quando questo veleno entrerà in circolo nelle tue vene, tesoro mio sarai fottuto. Non puoi fuggire via, puoi solo pregare di essere risparmiato da morte certa, come la vittima prega il carnefice di lasciarla andare. In alternativa potrai anche combattere, ma sarà come scontrarsi con i mulini a vento, che senso avrebbe?

The following link is to my page where my numerous poems can be found:

J: Thank you for sharing with us. My best for a popular career in poetry.

A: Thanks for the opportunity. I hope many will enjoy my creations.

Here is a sample of Angela’s poetry:

Original (Italian)
ASSOPITA DALLE TENEBRE,                                                                                                  

TU SEI LI' AD ASPETTARMI,

MOSTRANDOMI I CANINI,

PRONTO AD ASSALIRMI, RIGENERANDOTI CON LA MIA LINFA...
CON LE TUE UNGHIE GRAFFI LA MIA PELLE,
CON I TUOI BACI, LASCI IL TUO MARCHIO...
LASCIAMI IL SEGNO,
MIO AMATO IMMORTALE,
CON IL TUO SGUARDO TRAFIGGI LA MIA ANIMA,
TU SOPRA DI ME , FISSANDOMI CON OCCHI AFFAMATI,
IO RESTANDO INERME ALLE TUE LUSINGHE,
SENZA EMETTERE UN SUONO, TI SCRUTO......
AFFASCINATA DALLA TUA BELLEZZA,
E DALLE SENSAZIONI CHE LE TUE MANI GELIDE TOCCANO IL MIO CORPO, 
MI SENTO TRASCINARE DAL TUO VORTICE DI PASSIONE....
SONO NEL VARCO DELL' INFERNO,
NEL SUO ABISSO,
MA PER TE MIO AMATO,
SEGUIRTI ALL' INFERNO,
E' UN DOLCE VELENO,CHE HAI USATO PER RAPIRE IL MIO CUORE..


Translated
BENUMBED BY DARKNESS,
YOU’RE THERE, WAITING,
FLASHING FANGS,
READY TO SET ON ME, REFRESHING ON MY LYMPH …
YOUR CLAWS SCAR MY SKIN,
YOUR KISSES, LEAVING A MARK …
SO LEAVE YOUR BRAND ON ME,
BELOVED IMMORTAL,
SPELLBINDING MY SOUL AT EVERY GAZE,
OVER ME, WITH WOLF’S EYES,
I FEEL BOUND BY YOUR CHARM,
WORDLESS, I TAKE STOCK …
ENTHRALLED BY YOUR BEAUTY,
AND BY YOUR CHILLING HANDS, TOUCHING MY BODY,
I’M WISKED AWAY FROM YOUR VORTEX OF PASSION …
I’M AT HELL’S DOOR,
IN THE ABYSS,
YET, MY BELOVED,
FOLLOWING YOU TO HELL,
IT’S JUST A SWEET POISON YOU USED TO STEAL MY HEART…



IF YOU LIKED THIS INTERVIEW, PLEASE CLICK 'FOLLOW THIS BLOG' AND YOU WILL GET MORE ON ANGELA AND OTHER INTERESTING PEOPLE IN THE FUTURE. THANK YOU.

Sunday, January 15, 2012

ON THE CREATION OF FEEDING THE URGE OR FRANKENSTEIN HAD IT RIGHT! by Jeffrey Kosh


Oh, I do not dare to compare my little piece of fiction with Mary Shelley’s masterpiece.
No, what I’m trying to convey here is what I’ve felt in the seven months it took me to bring to life my mongrel son. You see, it’s still covered in stitches and scars, wet bandages hang loose from its arms and legs, and … a convulse spasm keep twitching its limbs.
Writing ‘Feeding the Urge’ hasn’t been different from Dr. Frankenstein’s ghoulish labor.

It began with a dream, an idea on creating something new, something different from mainstay Horror literature, something which simply wasn’t there.
The dream became an obsession, and like that infamous 18th century scientist I began delving into forbidden knowledge and maddening stuff. Sometimes, even allowed me a grisly laugh, while researching on morgues, causes of death, and instruments of pain.

As Victor, I ventured into forlorn graveyards of human knowledge, unearthing the bodies of those who preceded me, studying their anatomy and complexities.
Next, came the meat and bones of the story. I spent whole nights penning down my manuscript, assembling and dissecting it again, always looking for perfection, yet achieving none.
Once, it looked too different from what I had in mind, a wretched creature which disgusted my very eyes. At another time, it distanced so much from whom I intended it to be, it almost became a true crime story. I could not allow it. So, I burked it with a pillow, and created a new head for it.
This head was Nemesis. Since I do not want to spoil my novel for you, I’m not going to reveal who – or what – this Nemesis is.

At last, exhausted by my long fatigues, I collapsed and left the unliving husk rotting on the lab’s trestle table. I had had enough with it. I was starting to hate the miserable creature, even being unable to let my weary eyes rest for a single instant on its hideous body.
Still, inside, I loved it.
I relaxed myself trying to pen another story, a simpler one, shorter in stature, but higher in spirit.
This had to be settled in late 1666 AD, in the Caribbean Sea, away from the trappings of modern age. I enjoyed the setting, rejoiced in its humor and carefree mood. 
However, it will not last, because from that shapeless mound of dead flesh came out a cry so chilling and so disturbing that I could not refrain to rush down my mind’s lab in succor of the poor beast.

It was alive. 
It breathed, yet it couldn’t move. Eyes still missing, it frantically tried to get out of that perpetual darkness I had sentenced it into. With renewed fervor I sat down, and started a new makeover. This time it would be perfect. And it did.
Almost.

Feeding the Urge received its first spark of true life on the night of January 1st 2012.
It was even a stormy night here in Ao Nang.
Unlike its literary analogue it started to talk immediately and is even able to enjoy a good conversation.
Yet, beware, because inside that large skull lays still an abnormal brain.
Mine.

MY TWO CENTS ON: HORROR AND ISOLATION


We knew, as kids, the fear of being alone in the dark. Or better, the fear of not being completely alone. We instinctively were afraid of feeling little and abandoned, facing something lurking under our bed or inside the closet. So we stared, wide-eyed and shaking, at imaginary creatures which took shape in the shadows; monsters which craved for our eyes to close. Because no one could help us; because no one was there with us.

Horror thrives in isolation. Few human beings are able to shake off the fear of being alone, in the darkness, out of the comforts which civilization breeds. Even as adults, we still feel the need for the presence of someone who cares enough to protect us.

Physical isolation is often used in Horror to pry open the locked lid our infancy’s terrors.
As an adult, you feel only frustration should your car get stalled on a forlorn country road in broad daylight. Yet, should it happen by night, things really change. For imagination and childhood fears resurface, creating dangers at every nook and shadows, lingering in our minds.

Social isolation is used in Horror to feed the instinctual fear of the stranger and unfamiliar.
Foreigners (like me in Thailand) are isolated by language and custom. Social diseases can cut off an individual from mainstay society, denying him the comfort of community while living in it. Pariah and outcasts are a terrible sight in some lands. Horror stories which prosper on social isolation often feature viruses or other infective menaces.

John Carpenter’s ‘The Thing’ made use of both techniques of terror; physical isolation (by placing the story inside an Antarctic research base) and social isolation (by having the alien creature be able to infect and double human beings) creating a deadly mix which resulted in developing one of isolation’s closest siblings: paranoia.

That’s why in almost all Horror movies you see the characters being separated from their party one by one.
Because isolation breeds fear.

That’s why I dread ‘Social Networks’. I use them, yet sometimes, there, I feel like Jonathan Harker:

If there were anyone to talk to I could bear it, but there is no one.
Bram Stoker's Dracula

Saturday, January 14, 2012

AUTHORS AND JEALOUSY


AUTHORS AND JEALOUSY

Jealousy is a stupid feeling in itself, among fellow writers it gets even dumber, look at this interesting post by K.M. Weiland of Wordplay: Helping Writers Become Authors at:

http://writetodone.com/

THE BEER CHRONICLES - BY SCOTT LANGE

I'd like to share some good reading for my friends. Prepare beer, pretzels, and ... a strong stomach:
The Beer Chronicles by Scott Lange
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12383845-the-beer-chronicles

Friday, January 13, 2012

INTRODUCING MYSELF ...


Hello, I’m Jeffrey Kosh.
You surely recognized me as the author of the novel ‘Feeding the Urge’.
No? You do not even know what I’m garbling about?
Well, you’re right.
Feeding the Urge is my first published novel and will be widely available on the general market within two months, or later.

Mr. Gary Starta was so kind to invite me on spreading my senseless blurb on his blog.
I must admit feeling uneasy staying shoulder-to-shoulder with such giants as Rebecca Besser and Jennifer Chase; it’s just like being invited to a party where everyone is an accomplished professional and you feel you should be serving cocktails to these people, not having conversations. Unfortunately, I’m a talker, and once you start me it is difficult to shut me up.
However, for your eyes’ delight I’m going to restrain myself.

Feeding the Urge is about ancient spiritual beliefs seen under a modern point of view. Axel, the main character, is an unusual kind of serial killer – or more likely, a serial vigilante, if such a thing ever existed – experiencing a need to kill those he feels responsible for our society’s ill. People who feed on other’s fear. The novel tells his exploits from the age of ten, when he was abused by a pedophile, and rescued by … something else.
It is also the story of Cheri Ridge, a Cherokee dancer who should be dead, and maybe she is, somehow. Raised by a White Shaman, she has grown up immersed in her people’s folklore and belief system, and this is going to ‘feed her urge’.
The paths of these two weird individuals are going to merge, yet with an unexpected ending.
Well, I’m not going to spoil the rest of the novel; I hate when authors do that.

David Brin said that he feels like a shaman, creating images and alternate realities in other minds.
That fits my way of writing; I summon stories from another place, they’re already there ready to be told. The matter rests in the author’s skill to convey it.
I figure that had Jennifer Chase or Gary Starta encroached on Axel’s story before me, they would surely weave it in different ways. My specialty involves inner feelings and how they affect the individual.  

To learn more about me visit my website, Jeffrey Kosh’s Prosperity Glades:

Or contact me directly on Facebook, Twitter, or Google +.

As a compulsive chatterer you’ll find me everywhere.